Tuesday, September 8th, 2015

Plumber, Pipefitter, Journeyman, Sanitation Engineer – By any name, it’s one of our country’s most important jobs.

“If I [were] a young man again and had to decide how to make my living, I would not try to become a scientist or scholar or teacher. I would rather choose to be a plumber … in the hope to find that modest degree of independence still available under present circumstances.”

– Albert Einstein, The Reporter, 18 November 1954

Americans take many of our modern conveniences for granted. Each morning, we turn on the tap, brush our teeth, flush the toilet, take a shower, make the coffee, and start our day with running water. We seldom think about the manpower and infrastructure required to keep our water flowing. Oh, sure, the Cincinnati and Dayton Water Works has a big part to play in our central water and sewage systems. But from the pipes to your home or business, who keeps everything in good working order? Your local plumbers.

According to US News & World Report, “All it takes is one lousy morning with no running water (or a clogged sink or phantom-flushing toilet) to remind us how dependent we are on the expertise of plumbers. But troubleshooting is just a sliver of their responsibilities. The men and women working in this profession develop blueprints to plan where pipes and fixtures should be plotted in a structure. They also install and connect the piping and fixtures, either working individually or with a team of apprentices and pipefitters. In addition to facilitating water supply from pipes and large fixtures, such as bathtubs, showers, sinks and toilets, plumbers ensure that water reaches appliances like dishwashers and water heaters. The best in the occupation are strong problem-solvers who have mastered customer service and can meet the physical and mechanical demands of the job.”

At Allied Reddi-Rooter, we are looking for personable, customer-centered problem-solvers who enjoy working with water issues and keeping household and small business plumbing systems in good, healthful, working order. It’s a dirty, hands-on job that provides a variety of situations each day. Masterful customer service skills, a cheerful outlook, relationship building and, of course, analytical and hands-on engineering skills are required. A good understanding of math (including angles), hand tools, and piping strategies is a must.

Salary Scale – It Varies but It’s Good
According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, the 2013 median salary for a plumber was about $50,180. At the high-end, highly skilled and successful plumbers running their own shop can earn about $86,120; entry level positions earn about $29,590 annually. Plumbing is a career that still uses the apprentice model; apprentices typically earn about half the wages of a fully trained plumber.

How Do I Become A Plumber?
Time, patience, trade school course work, study and hands-on training are the formula for becoming a skilled plumber. US News & World Report notes that “Traditionally, a hopeful plumber begins a four- or five-year apprenticeship program to receive technical education and complete the required hours of on-the-job training under a licensed professional. Plumbers who have successfully completed their apprenticeship are known as journeymen.”

Typically, an apprentice plumber undergoes about 250 hours of course work, math, applied physics and chemistry. About 2,000 hours of paid, practical training alongside an experienced plumber is also required. Last but not least, safety training is crucial in this field because injuries are common in this line of work (plumbing is considered to be part of the construction industry). To work independently, one or more licenses are required.

Water You Waiting For? A career as a plumber is a noble one. And, once you become a plumber, you’ll never have to call one again (think of the savings!). If you are interested in working with an A-team of skilled, professional plumbers, talk with Ray today. 513-396-5300.