Thursday, March 12th, 2015

Drain Clogs – You make ’em, we break ’em

While cleaning the quarterly buildup of hair, soap gunk and who-knows-what-else out of the shower drain this weekend, two thoughts came to mind:

1. Yay! No more standing in water while taking a shower.
2. Hairy traps are disgusting. Blech.

Common Clogs
Indoor running water is a miracle of modern plumbing. Even more important, however, is a fully functioning drain that sends used water outside to the sanitary sewer system. Without a good drain, life gets messy, fast. Here’s a quick rundown of common clogs and the tools typically used to remove them:

Lavatory/Shower/Tub Clogs
· Hair
· Washcloths

Tools: Sink plunger (the type without the extension on the end of the suction cup), hand-cranked eel (for the wash cloth clog), or a “flexi-tool” with a Velcro-like tip. For an example, watch this video: http://flexisnakecanada.com/ The flexi-tool is our hands down favorite for bathroom sink hair removal. It’s inexpensive and highly effective.

Toilet Clogs
· Toilet paper, etc. (and you know what we mean by “etc.”)
· Washcloths/sponges
· Toys/toothbrush/comb/smart phones

Tools: Toilet plunger (the type with the extension on the end of the suction cup). This video (https://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v=wT5C09JvkAU) shows the proper types of toilet plungers and techniques for either a) retrieving the item causing the clog or b) sending the clog down the drain.

Kitchen Sinks/Garbage Disposals
· Food (especially stringy items such as celery and sauerkraut)
· Grease
· Candle wax

Tools: Sink plunger (see) This video (https://www.youtube.com/watchv=n3kVpCEsOqA&feature=player_embedded) is a good how-to (note he is using a sink plunger, not a toilet plunger). When dealing with grease clogs, a good first step is carefully pouring very hot water laced with heavy-duty dish soap is worth a try. If that fails, you may want to consult a plumber.

Water You Waiting For? At Allied Reddi-Rooter, we’re experts at removing clogs and fixing plugged drains. For sinks and lavatories, let us know if the water is draining s-l-o-w-l-y (a good sign) or if it’s completely plugged (a bad sign).

For toilets, call immediately at the first sign of a toilet paper-based clog. Those babies only get worse and our team would like to resolve them sooner rather than later. Call Ray today at 513-396-5300.